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PostPosted: Sun Aug 01, 2021 1:50 pm 
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Hello,

Should I be applying effects on each track on pre or post during the recording process?


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 01, 2021 6:54 pm 
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You have the option of inserting an effect which means it prints to the recording. When you do that it's permanent to the instrument or vocal. If you're happy with the results, then you can release the effect from the track and you'll still be able to send 2 effects to the final mixdown of your song.

At the end of the day, it depends on what you need and how much of it.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 01, 2021 10:44 pm 
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boogie47 wrote:
Hello,

Should I be applying effects on each track on pre or post during the recording process?



Depends on how you are using the effect.

there are two effect buses. You can insert an effect into the chain of both inputs and tracks. If you do this then the EFF is only applied to that input or track. If you insert an EFF into the input chain, the processing that occurs will be printed to the recording and as so will be permanent ( not adjustable later ). If that is what you want, go ahead and do that, but you need to be sure the settings you choose for the EFF will suit your purposes as the project develops.

If you instead insert an EFF into a Track, and then arm that track to an input for recording, you will hear the EFF processing as you monitor during the recording process, BUT that EFF will not be printed to the recording. The actual recording of an input's signal occurs just after the Analog/to/Digital conversion, but before that digitized signal is sent to the track for monitoring. So you are able to put some verb into the ear of a vocalist during tracking without commitment to the final amount. This leaves mixdown options open. This is the preferred way for many. As i said, if you insert an effect into the input chain you are committing yourself.

Rather than inserting an Eff to an input or a track, the other option is to use the EFF BUS. In this case you dial up how much signal is sent from each individual track to the bus and then that bus is EFFed as a group and sent then to the LR bus via the Return. In this case if you designate a track on the EFF send screen as pre fader, you will be able to pull that track's fader all the way down, so no dry signal gets to the LR( stereo red fader) bus, but the signal sent pre fader still goes to the EFF bus and so makes it to the LR through the return. So this gives you control of wet/dry balance.

In summary, unless you know the inserted eff is just right, don't insert eff into an input. rather wait and the insert the EFF to a specific track at mixdown or ( more usually) utilize the EFF send/return bus to set levels sent to the EFF, either pre or post.

So a lot depends on your workflow and your confidence level re commitment as to how much EFF will work with the track you are recording. When not sure - do not insert EFF into inputs, leave it to mixdown, as Ron suggested.

As for pre or post fader, the usual way is post. If you go post, the fader is the gate keeper. With compressors for eg, you may want the compressor to work harder as you lift the fader within the mix. On the other hand you may want the EFF to work on the track at the level that it sits at, as recorded, and then adjust the volume of that EFFed signal as it goes into the mix.

Clear as mud!

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 01, 2021 10:55 pm 
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Byron wrote:
boogie47 wrote:
Hello,

Should I be applying effects on each track on pre or post during the recording process?



Depends on how you are using the effect.

there are two effect buses. You can insert an effect into the chain of both inputs and tracks. If you do this then the EFF is only applied to that input or track. If you insert an EFF into the input chain, the processing that occurs will be printed to the recording and as so will be permanent ( not adjustable later ). If that is what you want, go ahead and do that, but you need to be sure the settings you choose for the EFF will suit your purposes as the project develops.

If you instead insert an EFF into a Track, and then arm that track to an input for recording, you will hear the EFF processing as you monitor during the recording process, BUT that EFF will not be printed to the recording. The actual recording of an input's signal occurs just after the Analog/to/Digital conversion, but before that digitized signal is sent to the track for monitoring. So you are able to put some verb into the ear of a vocalist during tracking without commitment to the final amount. This leaves mixdown options open. This is the preferred way for many. As i said, if you insert an effect into the input chain you are committing yourself.

Rather than inserting an Eff to an input or a track, the other option is to use the EFF BUS. In this case you dial up how much signal is sent from each individual track to the bus and then that bus is EFFed as a group and sent then to the LR bus via the Return. In this case if you designate a track on the EFF send screen as pre fader, you will be able to pull that track's fader all the way down, so no dry signal gets to the LR( stereo red fader) bus, but the signal sent pre fader still goes to the EFF bus and so makes it to the LR through the return. So this gives you control of wet/dry balance.

In summary, unless you know the inserted eff is just right, don't insert eff into an input. rather wait and the insert the EFF to a specific track at mixdown or ( more usually) utilize the EFF send/return bus to set levels sent to the EFF, either pre or post.

So a lot depends on your workflow and your confidence level re commitment as to how much EFF will work with the track you are recording. When not sure - do not insert EFF into inputs, leave it to mixdown, as Ron suggested.

As for pre or post fader, the usual way is post. If you go post, the fader is the gate keeper. With compressors for eg, you may want the compressor to work harder as you lift the fader within the mix. On the other hand you may want the EFF to work on the track at the level that it sits at, as recorded, and then adjust the volume of that EFFed signal as it goes into the mix.

If you do insert an EFF into an input or track, pay attention to the EFF edit screen as there is a wet/dry control there. You usually do not want 100% EFF in an insert. Often 5 - 15% is appropriate for an inserted. In the Send/Return mode 100% wet dry works best as you can send less or utilize the pre/post option as i described above.

Clear as mud!

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Byron


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 01, 2021 11:02 pm 
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Byron wrote:
Byron wrote:
boogie47 wrote:
Hello,

Should I be applying effects on each track on pre or post during the recording process?



Depends on how you are using the effect.

there are two effect buses. You can insert an effect into the chain of both inputs and tracks. If you do this then the EFF is only applied to that input or track. If you insert an EFF into the input chain, the processing that occurs will be printed to the recording and as so will be permanent ( not adjustable later ). If that is what you want, go ahead and do that, but you need to be sure the settings you choose for the EFF will suit your purposes as the project develops.

If you instead insert an EFF into a Track, and then arm that track to an input for recording, you will hear the EFF processing as you monitor during the recording process, BUT that EFF will not be printed to the recording. The actual recording of an input's signal occurs just after the Analog/to/Digital conversion, but before that digitized signal is sent to the track for monitoring. So you are able to avoid commitment, but still put some verb into the ear of a vocalist (during tracking) without commitment to the final amount. This leaves mixdown options open. This is the preferred way for many. As Ron said, if you insert an effect into the input chain you are committing yourself.

Rather than inserting an Eff to an input or a track, the other option is to use the EFF BUS. In this case you dial up how much signal is sent from each individual track to the bus and then that bus is EFFed as a group and sent then to the LR bus via the Return. In this case, if you designate a track on the EFF send screen as pre fader, you will be able to pull that track's fader all the way down in the mix, so no dry signal gets to the LR( stereo red fader) bus, but the signal sent pre fader still goes to the EFF bus and so makes it to the LR through the return. So this gives you control of wet/dry balance.

In summary, unless you know the inserted eff is just right, don't insert eff into an input. rather wait for mixing and then insert the EFF to a specific track at mixdown or ( more usually) utilize the EFF send/return bus to set levels of multiple tracks sent to the EFF, either pre or post.

So a lot depends on your workflow and your confidence level re commitment as to how much EFF will work with the track you are recording. When not sure - do not insert EFF into inputs, leave it to mixdown, as Ron suggested.

As for pre or post fader when an EFF is inserted to a track or input , the usual way is post. If you go post, the fader is the gate keeper. With compressors for eg, you may want the compressor to work harder as you lift the fader within the mix. On the other hand you may (more usually for me) want the EFF to work on the track at the level that it sits at, as recorded, and then adjust the volume of that EFFed signal as it goes into the mix. That would be when the assignment is pre fader. But when inserted into an input I would always use the post fader, I am thinking

If you do insert an EFF into an input or track, pay attention to the EFF edit screen as there is a wet/dry control there. You usually do not want 100% EFF with an insert. Often 5 - 15% is appropriate for an inserted EFF.

In the Send/Return EFF mode though 100% wet/ dry works best, as you can either send less and/or utilize the pre/post option as i described above.

When in doubt, use post. That is the default.


Clear as mud!

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Byron


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 08, 2021 12:43 pm 
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Dude

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Thanks Byron, this really helps understand the process and the options I have available.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 08, 2021 3:29 pm 
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Good luck with your work. When it comes to EFF - don't don't overlook the maxim that less is often better. I often aggressively dial up EFF, DYN etc., to get the sound in my ear, with the full intention of dialing it back or (sometimes) forgoing altogether.

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