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PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2006 4:39 pm 
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Dude

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I'm about to purchase some microphones for recording drums. I don't wanna go completely nuts moneywise, but I still want it to sound good.

I've read several places thta the shure sm57 is "the" snaremice - anybody have experience with it?

Kickmike?

Overheads - I have a ADK Hambourg Edition I use for vocals. Can it be used for overheads? Or maybe something else?

Milkman


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2006 4:57 pm 
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Wants You
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I don't have a ton of experience recording live drums but I would advise you start with a simple 3-4 mic set-up.

The SM57 seems to be the de facto mic of choice on snare although some of the others here might want to chip in with some alternative choices.

There seem to be 3 or 4 favorites for kick drum including the AKG D112, Audio Technica ATM-25 & mics from Audix & Shure who's model #'s escape me at the moment.

You might want to go with a pair of mics as overheads to give some stereo effect. These would generally be condenser mics to pick up some sizzle from the cymbals. Your ADK mic would probably work fine as a single overhead for starters.

Good luck & have fun. :)


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2006 6:03 pm 
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Tinhorn
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We went the el-cheapo route using Apex drum mics.

http://www.apexelectronics.com/index.php?tmp=3&id=24

We use a 125, 126 and a 770. The only change I would make is to add a a second 770 condensor overhead.

They are quite inexpensive and we have been satisfied with the sound. Surprised actually, better than we expected.

Now, they are NOT comparable to AKG and Audio Technica. We wanted an entry level set to get started, to see how much use they would get etc. before we splurged on some more expensive mics.


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 Post subject: Decent 4 mic setup
PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2006 6:49 pm 
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The General

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I'm happy with the results I get using the following 4 mic setup:

Kick- Audix D6 (you can not get a bad kick sound with this mic)
Snare- Audix i5 (I like it better than my SM57, both are good)
Overheads- Studio Projects C4 pair (recorded to a stereo track)

The top two clips from the link below were recorded in this manner:

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemus ... dID=274310

I find that the 4 mic setup gives a very "open" and natural drum kit sound.

Gary


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2006 3:29 am 
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City Slicker

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I'm ordering a set of drum mics tomorrow from a company called red 5 audio. you buy straight from them so distributor/retailers are put outta the equation meaning more for ur money. They've been getting pretty good writeups on the net and in magazines. the cheapest set they do is £200, I'm getting the £300 set :)

http://www.red5audio.com


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2006 11:03 am 
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Guitar Ho
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For the money, an SM57 is a real workhorse. Guitar amps and snares being most applied, but I have even seen groups like Metallica use it as a vocal mic in the studio. :shock:

For drums, we're pretty picky here at Studio ChâteauNeuf. Shure's drum mics are nothing to write home about. Audix are good, especially their kick mic, and for a 9 mic set, not bad in price.

However, we opted for Sennheisers. We started with this kit:

Image About 500€, and then added to it by buying extra e604s at around 100€ each

Now, I'm starting to replace the set with their top of the line. So far we have in the arsenal:

Kick and Snare mics
ImageImage

And then, I have to add 5 of these! :roll:

Image

This gets up there. Total set: 1170€

For overheads I had a real cheap pair at first, one hit the stage and all the phantom power in the world don't help. So I replaced them with a pair of Behringers B5s. Not bad, but one is hotter than the other. I picked these up to give them a try for a piano I had to record, and just loved them...really captured the grand. I'm gonna try them as overheads.

Image

Beyerdynamic MCE530 matched pair. The price was right, a little over 200€, but I wasn't overly impressed when they arrived: plastic housing. But I had to use them so use them I did. Very nice dynamic range on the piano. We'll see.

Of course, one can dream, I would die for a matched pair like these:

Image

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2006 5:17 pm 
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Dude

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Thank you for input so far. :)


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2006 9:58 pm 
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Cowhand
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Milkman, My only advice is to stay away from the super cheap drum Mic bundles that are out now. I have actually witnessed several different brands CRAPPING OUT IN THE MIDDLE OF A SHOW.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2006 10:40 pm 
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Yeah, that's one of the reasons we picked Sennheisers. We ran those things both in the studio and on the road for close to three years, and never once deep sixed us. Can't say the same for the El Cheapo overheads, but I guess if I would have fallen from the height of the overhead onto a concrete floor on my head, I wouldn't work to well either.

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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2008 5:12 pm 
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Trevoire520 wrote:
I'm ordering a set of drum mics tomorrow from a company called red 5 audio.


well, after reading this post, and doing some research...I ended up picking up the RVK7 kit. I read Bartman's post, priced what he mentioned (used of course) and for about $100 less, I got this. Let's hope the reviews weren't BS. $245 shipped ain't too shabby...and they've got a place in Florida where they keep a smaller inventory...so shipping wasn't but $15.00.

http://www.red5audio.com/acatalog/Drum_Kit_Mics.html

I really hope this pays off. It not that we're looking to get something out of our little jam sessions, but damnit, I want stuff to sound as good as I can get it...within budget..lol! I'm also in the market for a used drum set to practice on, so maybe I'll just record my own stuff anyway...screw those guys! :lol:

They're due in on Thursday, and Friday night is the big test. Never mic'd a kit before...should be interesting. Got some great ideas from this here forum and you kind folks! Is it Friday yet???? I smell something in the air...

Hopefully I'll have something worth putting up somewhere to share...

bh

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2008 9:34 pm 
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The General

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Yo bh....

good luck with the session.

A few things I wish I would have known before the first time I recorded drums.

- Phase cancellation is your enemy. Make sure everything is in phase before you record. Hitting the phase switch button afterwards (IMHO) doesn't help much.

- Spend alot of time with mic position and don't try to get too close to the skins. If you "choke" the drums you won't get an open sound, particularly the snare and kick. Overhead positioning is key to phase issues....a few inches can make a big difference.

- Once you set levels for your drummer's hardest strike, leave a lttle more room. He/she will hit harder when you hit record....guaranteed.

- There is a place in the room wher drums sound best, find it. It is different in every room.

Good luck and enjoy!

Gary


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 7:11 am 
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Tinhorn
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Bartman wrote:
Yo bh....

Phase cancellation is your enemy. Make sure everything is in phase before you record. Hitting the phase switch button afterwards (IMHO) doesn't help much.


Not sure what this means, but work is sloooooooow tonight so guess what I'm doin.. =P~

bartman wrote:
Spend alot of time with mic position and don't try to get too close to the skins. If you "choke" the drums you won't get an open sound, particularly the snare and kick. Overhead positioning is key to phase issues....a few inches can make a big difference.


Please tell me that the clip-on's for the tom/snare mics won't be "too close"??? I'm guessing if so, the only adjustment I could make is the downward angle? We have a boom we'll use for one overhead condenser, and a small stand where we'll put the other condenser up under the hihat (this is how the guys mic'd the Red5 kit in one of the reviews). Mic the snare, and between the two toms and then the kick...and maybe one between the last kick mounted tom and the floor tom...just for a starting position of course. I frickin cant wait for Friday!!

bartman wrote:
Once you set levels for your drummer's hardest strike, leave a lttle more room. He/she will hit harder when you hit record....guaranteed.


Understood...our guy does tend to hit a little harder as we get more and more into a groove. All we do is improv, there's no orginazation whatsoever...but when we find each other is when things start gettin loud.

bartman wrote:
There is a place in the room where drums sound best, find it. It is different in every room.


Unfortunately we have no space to move the kit. We'll see how it goes... it's all good though...more practice for me with the "G". =D> And I talked to a buddy who does studio work (drums), he's got a huge garage and wants me to mic his kit and lay some stuff down to see what sort of results we can get....now that, I am seriously looking forward to. He's been away from recording for a while and just wants to have some fun. This guy is sought after by local bands all the time so I know I'll have the same consistant playing and I'll be able to tell just how well I can mic and mix things in the end...again, more practice with the "G"!


Thanks alot for the tips Gary...I've got the checklist written down already!


Scott

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 1:40 pm 
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The General

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bhmann wrote:
bartman wrote:
Spend alot of time with mic position and don't try to get too close to the skins. If you "choke" the drums you won't get an open sound, particularly the snare and kick. Overhead positioning is key to phase issues....a few inches can make a big difference.


Please tell me that the clip-on's for the tom/snare mics won't be "too close"??? I'm guessing if so, the only adjustment I could make is the downward angle?


You should have room to adjust the mic further away from the drum head with the clip on mount. I use a clip on mounts for toms and mount one mic between two toms, much like you described.

Gary


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 2:40 pm 
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Tinhorn
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Bartman wrote:
bhmann wrote:
bartman wrote:
Spend alot of time with mic position and don't try to get too close to the skins. If you "choke" the drums you won't get an open sound, particularly the snare and kick. Overhead positioning is key to phase issues....a few inches can make a big difference.


Please tell me that the clip-on's for the tom/snare mics won't be "too close"??? I'm guessing if so, the only adjustment I could make is the downward angle?


You should have room to adjust the mic further away from the drum head with the clip on mount. I use a clip on mounts for toms and mount one mic between two toms, much like you described.

Gary


Sounds good...I'll be sure to listen carefully to any changes made. Thanks again Gary!!

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