The DijonStock Digital Home Recording Support Forum

*** USER REGISTRATION DISABLED! FOR ACCESS TO THE BOARD, MAIL TO registration AT dijonstock DOT com. THANK YOU ***
It is currently Tue Jul 17, 2018 11:13 pm

All times are UTC + 1 hour [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 7:30 am 
Offline
Greenhorn

Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 12:08 am
Posts: 100
is there any professional tips and or ideas for making my guitar sound different from the left side hard panned to the right side hard panned?..maybe some EQ tricks, miking tricks, amps setting?...give me anything..please!!..I'm using a gibson les paul black beauty.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 10:21 am 
Offline
Robbie The Botkiller
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 19, 2004 12:46 pm
Posts: 5097
Location: Netherlands
Favourite food: Ria's cheesecake
Machine type: AW16G
I'd record the guitar dry to a mono track, and then copy the that one to the next track. Apply effects, eq, whatever you want on the first track, and different effects on the second. Pan the first one hard left, the other one hard right. Then, make a submix. The result will be on the stereo track, copy that to any paired track.

_________________

Don't judge the coffee by its cup.
The proof of the cheese is in the eating


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 10:31 am 
Offline
Mr. Blues
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 08, 2008 6:51 pm
Posts: 3371
Location: Germany
Favourite food: Sauerkraut ;-)
Machine type: AW2400
... also put a some ms silence to the start of one of this tracks, so one guitar is playing some ms later!
But the real deal and harder to do is play the guitar part twice (Doubling) with different amp settings and you will be amazed about the result if it was done well!

Andreas

_________________
Blues aint nothing but the blues!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 1:09 pm 
Offline
The General

Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 11:20 pm
Posts: 3870
NewGuY2 wrote:
is there any professional tips and or ideas for making my guitar sound different from the left side hard panned to the right side hard panned?..maybe some EQ tricks, miking tricks, amps setting?...give me anything..please!!..I'm using a gibson les paul black beauty.


The parts will only sound different if they ARE different. I like playing the same chords in different neck positions or inversions.

Want to make your guitar parts sound bigger, more interesting (different)? Play counter rhythms and/or counter melodies.

If you want the Phil Spector wall of sound.....erm, sound, then you need to double, triple, etc your parts on both sides. Use different settings, amps or effects like Rob & Andreas suggested.

Gary


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 3:52 pm 
Offline
Marker Magician
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 4:20 pm
Posts: 3462
Machine type: AW2400
If you do as Andreas wisely suggests (re inserting 3-7 ms at the beginning of one of the tracks) so they are playing at slightly different times, don't be surprised if this affects your perception of the pan you set up. Your brain locks on to the first thing it hears. so if two tracks are identical, your brain will perceive it to be coming from the location first encountered. But from the reading I have done this perception varies with the frequency too. Low lows and upper mids > highs do not cue directionality in the same way as do the mids.

this is why the settings and filters on your verbs are so important to the stereo picture you create.

This is ameliorated somewhat if you use different EQs/effects/ amp sims on the two identical (but one delayed) tracks. You will know the sound when you hear it. Just fiddle a bit, and then try to remember approximately what you did to get there, as the techniques may (or may not) work the next time.

On a slightly different topic -...

I have never done this, but I once read of recording an amp's output in a separate space from the artist, while in the "quiet space" where the artist is tracking - mic and record the strings of the electric guitar (ie unamplified) - for use further in the production process. Any ideas as to why this concept may or may not be of use?

_________________
Byron


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 4:21 pm 
Offline
The General

Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 11:20 pm
Posts: 3870
Byron wrote:
On a slightly different topic -...

I have never done this, but I once read of recording an amp's output in a separate space from the artist, while in the "quiet space" where the artist is tracking - mic and record the strings of the electric guitar (ie unamplified) - for use further in the production process. Any ideas as to why this concept may or may not be of use?


I've never done it but intuitively would only see it as useful (on most electric guitars) if the captured sound was heavily effected after the fact, then mixed back in to add....whatever it was you were trying to add.

Now if I still had my ES-335, THAT would be interesting.

Gary


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2009 3:58 am 
Offline
Review Guru
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2007 11:12 pm
Posts: 1156
Location: Connecticut
Favourite food: Vegetable Lasagne
Machine type: AW16G
I've actually done this in a roundabout way.
I miced the neck of the silent, dry electric guitar and had a signal also split going direct through the proper effects to another track.
I was able to obtain a clean and defined electric strum without the harsh volume that kind of compresses with the pickups in those delicate situations.
Kind of a perverted acoustic guitar trick. It's a good one too!

_________________
http://joelbooska.wixsite.com/thevideofringe


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2009 3:32 pm 
Offline
The General

Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 11:20 pm
Posts: 3870
joel2007 wrote:
I've actually done this in a roundabout way.
I miced the neck of the silent, dry electric guitar and had a signal also split going direct through the proper effects to another track.
I was able to obtain a clean and defined electric strum without the harsh volume that kind of compresses with the pickups in those delicate situations.
Kind of a perverted acoustic guitar trick. It's a good one too!


Can you post a clip so we can hear how it sounds?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2009 5:53 pm 
Offline
Greenhorn
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2006 1:45 pm
Posts: 170
Location: North Brunswick, NJ
Favourite food: Chili
I've had some luck with my acoustic 12-string by using two mics - one aimed at the bridge and the other at the neck at about the 12th fret. I panned one hard left and the other hard right. The sounds are different enough that it gives a nice stereo effect even though both mics are picking up the same performance. If you want to hear it, go here (facebook), find the player, and listen to 'Just Once More'.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2009 10:52 pm 
Offline
Review Guru
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2007 11:12 pm
Posts: 1156
Location: Connecticut
Favourite food: Vegetable Lasagne
Machine type: AW16G
Bartman wrote:
joel2007 wrote:
I've actually done this in a roundabout way.
I miced the neck of the silent, dry electric guitar and had a signal also split going direct through the proper effects to another track.
I was able to obtain a clean and defined electric strum without the harsh volume that kind of compresses with the pickups in those delicate situations.
Kind of a perverted acoustic guitar trick. It's a good one too!


Can you post a clip so we can hear how it sounds?


Gary, unfortunately, when I did the expiriment, it was for a string of disposable ideas that I have since deleted.
However I do recommend trying it as I plan to, once I find an application that needs it.

_________________
http://joelbooska.wixsite.com/thevideofringe


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 14, 2009 6:15 am 
Offline
Former Computer Geek
User avatar

Joined: Fri Mar 30, 2007 7:39 pm
Posts: 1556
Location: Tacoma, WA---Ghetto-licious!
Favourite food: Pizza, E.Coast plz!!
Machine type: AW1600
The guys are right when they say you should play it a couple of times. Make the main track sound just how you want it, then change your eq on your amp, and play it again exactly the same. Make one wet and one dry, whichever way you like it. It'll sound PHAT. I like three, the main yummy quitar sound in the middle, two very differently eq'd sounds left and right.

I'm not a huge fan of the delay thing. The fact that the tracks are unique will give you naturally some tiny delay that fattens up the sound.

-= Beer

_________________
I LOVE THIS!!! Ted Stevens, 82-year-old US Senator from Alaska and chairman of the Senate Committee on Science, Commerce and Transportation, for explaining in a speech how the Internet actually works: “It’s a series of tubes.”


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 14, 2009 10:10 am 
Offline
Review Guru
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2007 11:12 pm
Posts: 1156
Location: Connecticut
Favourite food: Vegetable Lasagne
Machine type: AW16G
Beerosaur wrote:
The guys are right when they say you should play it a couple of times. Make the main track sound just how you want it, then change your eq on your amp, and play it again exactly the same. Make one wet and one dry, whichever way you like it. It'll sound PHAT. I like three, the main yummy quitar sound in the middle, two very differently eq'd sounds left and right.

I'm not a huge fan of the delay thing. The fact that the tracks are unique will give you naturally some tiny delay that fattens up the sound.

-= Beer

3 times is a charm fo sho

_________________
http://joelbooska.wixsite.com/thevideofringe


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 1 hour [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group