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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 3:37 am 
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Website Slayer and Problem Solver
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I've been doing some demo recording for a couple of friends. Twice I've recorded one person singing and playing acoustic guitar at the same time. I use a small condensor at the neck of the guitar and a large condensor for the vocal. The small condensor picks up a slight amount of the vocal.

I can hear a very noticeable difference in the "tonality" of the vocal caused by the guitar mic. I.e., if I play the vocal with the vocal mic track only there is more treble vs. playing the both tracks together. Sounds a bit "honky" with both tracks. I guess I could be running into a phasing problem, but I'm close to the 3-to-1 rule distance I think.

What can be done to keep more of the vocal out of the guitar mic (baffles, etc.)?

Alternate is to try and get a good balance between voice and guitar levels with only one mic. Somewhat of a PITA, however. If you blow it, you can't do anything about the balance (or EQ) afterwards.

Thanks,

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 4:23 pm 
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Marker Magician
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Just a thought here, but what if the vocal and guitar mics were set up with inverted phase in the first place? Would the canceling create a more islolated track of each, provided both sources were mic'ed fairly close to its source? Haven't tried this yet, but some recent reading I was doing suggested that if two vocal mics are put together and phase inverted, and the vocalist sings directly into one mic, then much of the background stage noise would be canceled. A few weeks ago I was watching a DVD of an old Zepplin concert and the vocal mic had another mic crudely duct taped (did they have duct tape back then?) below it. I wondered why, but perhaps this is the answer.

Byron

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 5:03 pm 
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Mr. Blues
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Hi Byron

Byron wrote:
Just a thought here, but what if the vocal and guitar mics were set up with inverted phase in the first place? Would the canceling create a more islolated track of each, provided both sources were mic'ed fairly close to its source? Haven't tried this yet, but some recent reading I was doing suggested that if two vocal mics are put together and phase inverted, and the vocalist sings directly into one mic, then much of the background stage noise would be canceled. A few weeks ago I was watching a DVD of an old Zepplin concert and the vocal mic had another mic crudely duct taped (did they have duct tape back then?) below it. I wondered why, but perhaps this is the answer.

Byron


Thats not the reason, I think. If 2 microphones are used for vocals, 1 is for PA and 1 only for recording. In the good old days the mixers dont have enough indepent aux-ways for comfortable signal-routing.

Thats what weve done in the early 80s, when I was young :mrgreen:

Andreas

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 6:28 pm 
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I'll give the phase inversion a try and report back.

As I've thought about this more, I think the tonality change of the vocal is due to the off-axis nature of the vocal in the guitar mic. If the vocal sounded the same (but very low level) in the guitar mic, I don't think the tonality would change that much.

I'm also going to try something I just read about. Use two figure eight mics and point the null of each towards the undesired source (i.e. the vocal mic null would be pointed at the guitar and guitar mic null at the mouth).

Thanks for the input,

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:21 am 
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Tinhorn

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hey Ralph,

I ain't no expert.............but I'm happy to make a comment................I've been recording myself a lot lately.................lots of takes with me picking and strumming my 6 string acoustic guitar and singing.............I find my best results are with 1 mic..................I have an excellent pearlmanTM2 tube LDC............I plug it into an a-designs pacifica and then into the aw1600..................I have the mic in cardioid with the high cut switch on............the pacifica I have the gain turned all the way down with the pad out (mic puts out a hot signal................mic pre puts out a lot of signal even when turned all the way down)..........yamaha gain knob turned all the way down...........I also record myself playing my acoustic upright piano and singing...........same deal.................I'm pretty happy with the results..................just thought you'd be interested..............

chasman


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