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 Post subject: Recording dry...
PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 2:30 pm 
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Is it okay to record completely dry then add compression in post production or should compression always be applied at the time that you're recording?

Cin

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 2:49 pm 
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depends on the voice(s).

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 2:56 pm 
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Technically speaking, compressing is making a dynamic width smaller. That means that you need less bit to store a compressed audio file than an uncompressed audio file.

Assuming you do everything with the G (both recording and mixing), the "before bits" are equal to the "after bits". So, the source is not "compressed to 16 bit", it already was 16 bit! So if you need to apply compression on the G, print it to track!

If you record in 24 bit it's a different story. There you can afford to do a lot of things afterwards, because the dynamic range of 24 bit is so much bigger. There it makes sense to "compress to 16 bit", meaning you can have a high compression ratio and a high gain without getting the noise floor up to above 16 bit s/n ratio level.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 4:23 pm 
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Excellent! Thanks!!!

I'll try some of that this weekend.

Next, would you recommend using the G's compression or outboard?

Cin

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 Post subject: Recording dry...
PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 4:32 pm 
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CindaP wrote:
Is it okay to record completely dry then add compression in post production or should compression always be applied at the time that you're recording?

Cin


Perfectly acceptable to record dry. Recording dry allows for for flexibility and control when you are ready to mix. If you record with compression, you are stuck with it (technically, there are ways to fix it, but not easy ways).

If you have a singer who is "all over the place" in terms of volume.....can't work the mic or control their dynamics, it might be a good idea to compress or limit at the time you are recording so you don't get digital "overs".

Gary


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 6:44 pm 
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Robbie The Botkiller
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CindaP wrote:
Next, would you recommend using the G's compression or outboard?


The G's compressor is not very good.

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 Post subject: Re: Recording dry...
PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 6:45 pm 
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Bartman wrote:
Perfectly acceptable to record dry.


That is why you want 24 bit. To have Bartmans comment and mine be true at the same time - the best of both worlds.

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 Post subject: Re: Recording dry...
PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 8:20 pm 
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Robbie wrote:
Bartman wrote:
Perfectly acceptable to record dry.


That is why you want 24 bit. To have Bartmans comment and mine be true at the same time - the best of both worlds.


Robbie,

I may be wrong but I think Cinda was asking her question from a recording technique perspective (ie: controlling the vocal track with compression during or after tracking) rather than a techincal, 1's and zero's, 16 VS 24 bit data compression standpoint.

So yeah, our replies answered different questions.

Gary


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