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PostPosted: Thu May 13, 2010 2:54 pm 
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HamelnStock Survivor and Midi Guru
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Sometimes you hold a grip on the guitar which sounds just perfect but you have no idea what to name it. You could learn music theory but if that takes too long
here is a shortcut.

You will notice that a chord does not go by one name but has several. It seems that the well known Am is also known as "E supended 4th sharp 5th".

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2010 1:27 am 
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I believe it depends on the key of the song whether it's Am or E sus4#5. You could also say Am/E. Your choice which is the root or key note? One application is if there is a note movement ( walkup / or down) within a static chord. When sight reading it's easier to follow along than if suddenly on the page it changes from root E to root A. No need to change your grip. Perhaps you'll find a new way to finger that chord that allows more freedom for your fingers to reach other notes not commonly associated with embellishing that chord. Another situation that is more common are the ninth chords. The ninth is also the second, commonly notated as Add2. Generally ninths are lower tones within a chord. Add2 seems to be when the ninth is a tone higher than the highest root note in a chord. Anyhow with my unschooled theory app., that's how I name 'em down on the farm.

Bruce

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2010 3:40 am 
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Chords have names?

I'm one of those guys that doesn't know the names of chords, nor do I have the theory to figure them out. I know the names to basic chords, but there's a lot of chords that I play....that I couldn't tell you what they are.

I'll check out that site for sure Dirk.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 12:06 am 
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HamelnStock Survivor and Midi Guru
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They have not only names. It's a complete organized system. Once you get around it it comes in very handy. For example :
(i hope i get this right here)
Most common chords on are described by their root note C, D, E, F, G, A, B.

If you number these notes 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 you have the basic notes without the sharps

A Cmajor chord has the 1,3,5 structure So that is C, E and G.
You could form a D major by just skipping each finger one note to right (on a piano) but there is one problem. If you count how many notes there are from C to E including these two and counting the sharps you should get to five. C, C#, D, D# and E.

If you do the same thing with the D we just formed you will notice that (if you skip one note to the right from C) and count again, there is one sharp missing. That's because the jump between E and F is only half a tone (there is no black key between 'm) and from C to D is two half tones.

Melodies and chords are based on distances between notes and so you must keep them the same. If you want a D Major your first two notes must encompas five tones. The second part between F and A should encompas Four tones.

Now Between C, E and G the premises are met and so you get a C Major. If you want a matching D Major you have to correct the distance between D and F by moving your middle note up one half tone ending on the black F#. Now the distances are correct and you have a D Major.

By skipping to the right without correction you make what is known as a 1, 3b, Five Chord or in other words a One, Three Flat, five chord which is always a Minor chord by definition. So if you want a C Minor you have to lower the 3 note by half a tone.

E is exactly the same. F and G need no correction. A does too and B needs a double correction.

Now, If you need a C# for instance you move all the notes up by half a tone. If you want a CMajor7 You have to add the sevent note to the chord. (1,3,5,7) Same goes for a Ninth. (1,3,5,9). So a Bb chord is an A with all notes lowered by half a tone. A Major Seven Dominant is 1,3,5 b7 and so on. I must have a complete list somewhere here. If you like i can post it.

If you know the system you should be able to find many chords without having to look 'm up. I mentioned at least sixty here.

Try it, get it and you won't be sorry for the time it has taken. Great thing is it works on all the instruments. You only have to know where the notes are. This little trick will arm you with many of the most used chords.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 1:43 am 
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Ya. I checked that site out. Kinda missed your link the first time. Some very useful tools there. Thanks for posting it.

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If humanity is to pass safely through its present crisis on earth, it will be because a majority of individuals are now doing their own thinking". Buckminster Fuller
and..... 'learning to like to do what we have to do.'"


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 8:36 pm 
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HamelnStock Survivor and Midi Guru
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You are very welcome Bruce. I'm just paying back a little for all the info and even friends i found here. Cheers.

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